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Why co-creation is the key to a winning employee experience

The term “employee experience” is kind of a misnomer, isn’t it? It implies something singular—a walled-off experience that each individual employee goes through on their own. In actuality, the employee experience is much bigger than that. The average employee will interact with countless people and departments over the course of their lifecycle at your company, and each of those interactions feeds into their overall experience. But we don’t tend to think of it that way.    Today, many HR departments try to boil the employee experience down to a series of boxes on a checklist, especially when it comes to onboarding. Ticking off each box is viewed as something that just has to be done, with no one really stopping to think about why it has to be done—or whether it could be done better.   

The 5 biggest mistakes to avoid with employee surveys

A well-executed employee survey can be a powerful tool to improve engagement and performance in any organization. At the same time, a poorly executed survey can actually create confusion and disillusionment that negatively impacts these same outcomes. As you prepare for your next survey, take care to avoid these mistakes to ensure you make a positive impact instead of an unintended negative one. 

Asking vs. listening: What the difference means for employee engagement

Listening is one of those things that you probably don’t spend much time thinking about but ends up having a big impact on your life. For example, I’m the parent of a “tween” daughter who is finding it more and more challenging to listen to me. Just yesterday, I asked her nicely to clean up the mess she’d left the evening before. She had nodded when I first asked. To ensure that she heard me, I reminded her again a bit later. She nodded again. I assumed we were good and that I was understood.

How to recognize good employee survey design

It's become easier than ever to survey your employees. The technology is at your fingertips to create and send a survey whenever you want. This is both a good and a bad thing. While a survey can be one of the most powerful tools at your disposal in HR and management, the data you collect through a survey is only as good as the employee survey design.   Poorly designed surveys can result in misleading or unusable data. And to make matters worse, they’re confusing and frustrating for your employees. Good design is essential to ensuring that your survey has its desired effect.

Why emotional intelligence in managers matters—and how to boost it

Emotional intelligence (EQ) has become one of the most talked-about skills to hire for over the past few years, and it’s easy to see why. There are countless benefits of emotional intelligence in the workplace, from being able to communicate more effectively to dealing with stress better.   But one aspect of EQ that’s not talked about often enough is its role in effective management. The truth is, EQ is a determining factor in a manager’s ability to successfully lead their team. And while some people are naturally more emotionally intelligent than others, anyone can enhance and supplement their EQ skills with a little help from modern technology. Here’s why this strategy is worth considering:  

The vital first step to effective employee surveys (that you're probably skipping)

If you’ve been in HR for at least a few years, you’ve probably either administered or supported the use of employee surveys. Surveys have become one of the go-to tools as we try to create a better employee experience. As someone who loves surveys and collecting data, I’m thrilled that the use of surveys has become so commonplace. Employee surveys can be incredibly valuable and powerful when used the right way. The problem is that far too many surveys are poorly conceived and don’t ultimately solve the problem that prompted their creation.

How to promote diversity and inclusion with HR Service Delivery technology

We all know that diversity and inclusion is important. The sharing of different cultures, beliefs, values and norms has made us smarter, more innovative, empathetic and global. A lot of recent research supports the idea that greater workplace diversity leads to greater profitability, customer centricity and increased employee engagement.   Additionally, more and more socially-conscious Millennials and Gen Z are entering the workforce (33% of today’s workforce and 50% of the workforce by 2020). These workers are attracted to companies with formal, distinct and active inclusion programs—making diversity and inclusion programs a top priority for CEOs.