<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=127469634355496&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Let's Talk

What is digital employee experience? It's likely not what you think

When you hear the term “digital employee experience” your mind likely conjures an image of an employee curled up on her couch, computer propped up on her lap. That would be only partially accurate, because the digital employee experience applies to all employees, not just remote workers. 

Should you hire a VP of Employee Experience like Airbnb?

The concept of employee experience, or EX, is on the radar of many companies today, and for good reason. Improving the way employees think and feel about your organization at every touchpoint throughout their journey with you can have a dramatic impact on retention, engagement, and more. Whether it’s dedicating five minutes of attention to the topic in a weekly meeting or creating a full-fledged program, many organizations are channeling a lot of time and resources into improving EX.  

Why companies should invest in the manager experience

Today, several organizations have shifted their resources or technology investments to make a positive impact on the employee experience. For most companies, this usually means new perks and programs such as free lunch, new hire buddies, flexible time off, and training resources. While all these efforts are valuable, not every employee will be impacted by them in the same way. This is especially true for managers. They have a unique set of needs, but the manager experience is often overlooked when thinking about employee experience. 

Why co-creation is the key to a winning employee experience

The term “employee experience” is kind of a misnomer, isn’t it? It implies something singular—a walled-off experience that each individual employee goes through on their own. In actuality, the employee experience is much bigger than that. The average employee will interact with countless people and departments over the course of their lifecycle at your company, and each of those interactions feeds into their overall experience. But we don’t tend to think of it that way.    Today, many HR departments try to boil the employee experience down to a series of boxes on a checklist, especially when it comes to onboarding. Ticking off each box is viewed as something that just has to be done, with no one really stopping to think about why it has to be done—or whether it could be done better.   

Humanizing the employee experience: Think people, not profits

Employees are the lifeblood of your organization. They keep the lights on and the wheels turning. So it’s no surprise that creating a good employee experience—one that keeps them satisfied, productive, and engaged—is a top priority for most businesses. After all, replacing an employee can cost anywhere from 50-200% of their salary, so there’s a major business case to be made for improving their day-to-day experience at work. 

Employee relations issues: A make-or-break for employee experience

Most of us now know that the employee experience is more than just benefits, vacation policies and catered lunches. It’s about putting your people first and providing great service to them when it matters most. But those moments aren’t only the happy work life events, such as onboarding, having a baby, or an internal transfer or promotion. It’s equally as important to support employees and managers through the (hopefully) rare occasions that require disciplinary action or Employee Relations (ER) involvement.

Make seasonal and contingent workers a true part of your organization

As Black Friday, Cyber Monday and the holiday season fast approach, retailers and fulfillment centers are looking for seasonal workers to help meet the demand of the holiday spending season. Last year in the US alone, holiday sales rose to $691.9 billion in November and December, marking a 5.5% increase from the year before and the best holiday spending performance since 2005. This year, analysts are predicting that holiday sales will grow again.