Does Your Organization Have an Employee Service Philosophy?

Most organizations have customer service philosophies. Examples include “Put yourself in your customers’ shoes” and “Put your customers’ needs first.” A customer service philosophy is defined as a group of shared principles that guide every customer interaction. Often, they are linked to the organizational mission, vision, and values. Customer service philosophies include references to honesty, respect, empathy, and making customers a priority.   In thinking about external customer service philosophies, it raises a question. Shouldn’t organizations also have an employee (aka internal customer) service philosophy?  

How 2020 Has Upended the Employee Experience (EX) Model As We Knew It

In a 2019 survey, Deloitte found that 84% of business and HR leaders viewed improving the employee experience (EX) as important—and 28% considered it urgent. In the pre-pandemic world, with low unemployment and rising turnover rates, providing a positive EX was an essential talent attraction and retention tool.    Then COVID-19 hit.  

Do Your HR Processes Impact the Employee Experience? Learn Why They Should

The term “employee experience” is new and buzz-worthy, but the concept behind it is not. At the core of the employee experience come two critical building blocks: policy and process. Neither are sexy or groundbreaking. In fact, even the most astute and engaged HR professionals react to this statement with either a grimace, knowing how hard it is to make them exciting, or with a dismissive wave of the hand to say, “Obviously, the process impacts employee experience —everyone knows that!”  

How to Provide the Same Level of Service to On-site and Remote Employees

Willard Marriott, founder of Marriott International, is famously quoted as saying “Take good care of your employees, and they’ll take good care of your customers, and the customers will come back.” It makes a lot of business sense. But it raises the question, what does “take good care of your employees” mean?   

5 Key Elements to Creating a Hybrid Workforce

A recent article in Human Resource Executive Magazine posed the question “Is a hybrid workforce the wave of the future?”. A hybrid workforce is being defined as one where there’s a significant number of both onsite employees and remote employees. It might not be a balanced 50/50 but more of a situation where the percentages justify the need to consider each workforce group’s needs separately.

Changing Course: How COVID-19 Is Reshaping the Future of HR

When experts speculated back in January what the biggest HR trends would be this year, few could have predicted how radically the face of work would change just a few months later.    The coronavirus has altered the course of HR radically and, perhaps, permanently. There are few silver linings to the pandemic, but some of these changes may be for the better. Many employers are re-examining their relationships with employees through an increasingly empathetic lens. And many HR leaders are embracing the idea of building greater agility and flexibility into their policies and plans.    As you start to think about what the future looks like for your HR team, here are a few HR trends that have been upended by COVID-19—and a few that have been accelerated.

Let's Get Personal: Why You Should Tailor Technology to Employees

Today’s consumer experiences allow audiences to deeply personalize what they consume and how they consume it. Subscribers can change their Netflix avatars and customize their Watch List in a click, thus informing future movie and show suggestions to fit their preferences. People can create cartoon versions of themselves, Memojis, on their iPhones to personalize messages.