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About Jason Lauritsen

Jason Lauritsen is a keynote speaker, author, and consultant. He is an employee engagement and workplace culture expert who will challenge you to think differently. A former corporate Human Resources executive, Jason has dedicated his career to helping leaders build organizations that are good for both people and profits. Most recently, he led the research team for Quantum Workplace’s Best Places to Work program where he has studied the employee experience at thousands of companies to understand what the best workplaces in the world do differently than the rest. Jason is the co-author of the book, Social Gravity: Harnessing the Natural Laws of Relationships, and author of his new book, Unlocking High Performance, to be published by Kogan Page in October 2018.

Asking vs. listening: What the difference means for employee engagement

Listening is one of those things that you probably don’t spend much time thinking about but ends up having a big impact on your life. For example, I’m the parent of a “tween” daughter who is finding it more and more challenging to listen to me. Just yesterday, I asked her nicely to clean up the mess she’d left the evening before. She had nodded when I first asked. To ensure that she heard me, I reminded her again a bit later. She nodded again. I assumed we were good and that I was understood.

How to recognize good employee survey design

It's become easier than ever to survey your employees. The technology is at your fingertips to create and send a survey whenever you want. This is both a good and a bad thing. While a survey can be one of the most powerful tools at your disposal in HR and management, the data you collect through a survey is only as good as the employee survey design.   Poorly designed surveys can result in misleading or unusable data. And to make matters worse, they’re confusing and frustrating for your employees. Good design is essential to ensuring that your survey has its desired effect.

The vital first step to effective employee surveys (that you're probably skipping)

If you’ve been in HR for at least a few years, you’ve probably either administered or supported the use of employee surveys. Surveys have become one of the go-to tools as we try to create a better employee experience. As someone who loves surveys and collecting data, I’m thrilled that the use of surveys has become so commonplace. Employee surveys can be incredibly valuable and powerful when used the right way. The problem is that far too many surveys are poorly conceived and don’t ultimately solve the problem that prompted their creation.

Prepare for the Future of Work: Increasing workforce diversity

This is the last of my 8-post series about preparing your organization for the future of work. In each post, we looked at a data-based trend that is or will be disruptive to work as we know it. In the last post, we explored the impact of the rise of artificial intelligence (AI). Today, we’re going to dig into the increasing diversity of our workforce.  

Prepare for the Future of Work: The emergence of artificial intelligence

This is the seventh post of my series about preparing your organization for the future of work. In each post, we look at a data-based trend that is or will be disruptive to work as we know it. In the last post, we explored the impact of longer life expectancies on the workforce. Today, we’ll look at the impact of the rise of artificial intelligence (AI).

Prepare for the Future of Work: The increasing life expectancy

This is the sixth post of my series about preparing your organization for the future of work. In each post, we look at a data-based trend that is or will be disruptive to work as we know it. In the last post, we explored the disruption to traditional career development processes. Today, we examine the impact of longer life expectancies on the workforce.    

Prepare for the Future of Work: The shift from career paths to career experiences

This is the fifth post of my series about preparing your organization for the future of work. In each post, we look at a data-based trend that is or will be disruptive to work as we know it. In the last post, we explored how the increase in mobile technology is impacting work. Today, we dig into how our processes for career pathing and development are being disrupted.